• on 14th December, 2021

Vox Hiberniae: A Celtic Journey with St. John of the Cross – Harp, Voice and Strings

A Celtic Journey with St. John of the Cross – Harp, Voice and Strings

https://youtu.be/R2YGDeZ0haE

Vox Hiberniae, with Andrew Green, contemplate the life of St John of the Cross with Harp, Voice and Strings
(Subtitles available for Latin text, click the Subtitles/[CC] box onscreen)

00:00 O’Carolan’s Welcome (Turlough O’Carolan)
03:10 Qui Vult Venire Post Me (Chant)
05:16 Canticle 6.1 (St. John of the Cross)
05:48 Ps 64: In You Creation Finds it’s Joy (Ronan McDonagh)
09:38 3 Ascent 20.2 (St. John of the Cross)
09:58 Súile an Choilm (Ronan McDonagh)
12:48 Prayer of a soul taken with Love (St. John of the Cross)
13:33 Dark Night of the Soul (Loreena McKennitt)

For Ronan McDonagh’s music visit https://www.fuaimlaoi.com
For Loreena McKennitt’s music visit https://loreena-mckennitt-shop.myshop…

VOX HIBERNIAE:
Naomi Dunleavy-O’Shea (Violin)
Mary Louise O’Donnell (Harp/Organ)
Sarah Lane (Violin/Voice)
Kerrie O’Connor (Voice/Flute)

WITH Tenor Andrew Green

Camera and Sound: Jon Henderson
Location: Carmelite Monastery of the Immaculate Conception, Roebuck Road, Dublin 14, Ireland
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Vox Hiberniae together with Andrew Green draw on a variety of composers and genres to reflect musically on the life of St. John of the Cross. O’Carolan’s Welcome invites us into the Carmelite Monastery of the Immaculate Conception where the community of Discalced Carmelite Sisters continue the contemplative tradition of St. John of the Cross. The plainchant Qui Vult Venire Post Me is the Communion Antiphon used for the memorial of St John of the Cross on the 14th December and honours his response to Jesus’ call to “deny yourself, take up your cross and follow me”. Inspired by the spiritual canticle of St. John of the Cross Ronan McDonagh’s refrain in his setting of Psalm 64 echoes the psalmist’s reflection on the praises of God proclaimed in creation. The instrumental Súile an Choilm, translated as the eyes of the dove and referring to a passage from the Song of Songs, appears as the offertory piece in Ronan’s mass setting composed to mark the quincentenery of the death of St John of the Cross. Finally the saint’s most famous work “Dark Night of the Soul” is interpreted in Loreena McKennitt’s beautiful piece of the same name.

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